Anthropology and Folklore for Writers of Fictional Worlds - the Personal Blog version. For episode updates only, check out culturecoacher.tumblr.com
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Reblogged from chamyl  21,214 notes

fortunatelight:

thesassylund:

these people BURNED DOWN A HOUSE of a rape victim because she accused the (grand?)son of a senator and was a football player

their family was driven out of town 

if this was in india or pakistan, imagine the reaction that americans would have. the outrage, obama would probably make a speech on it to save women again but these people are sick freaks in america so no one gives a shit they were THIRTEEN AND FOURTEEN 

what the actual fuck

Reblogged from angrywocunited  24,329 notes
fuckyeahriotgrrrlsofcolor:

stfuconservatives:

This kickass lady (and Kansas state representative) really said that. 

"The Legislature’s annual attempt to repeal a statute allowing in-state tuition for Kansas students without legal residency drew an emotional crowd to a House committee Wednesday.
Students who have lived in the United States most of their lives got choked up as they described the academic lifeline in-state tuition has provided to improve their lives. A counselor who works with such students in Wichita high schools shed tears as she showed legislators a scrapbook of success stories. Murmurs of unrest were heard in the gallery as one House member asked about the prevalence of illegal immigrants from gangs and drug cartels in American prisons.
But nothing drew a bigger reaction than when Rep. Ponka We-Victors, D-Wichita, wrapped up a series of questions to the bill’s chief proponent, Secretary of State Kris Kobach.
“I think it’s funny Mr. Kobach, because when you mention illegal immigrant, I think of all of you,” said Victors, the Legislature’s lone American Indian member.
The heavily pro-immigrant gallery burst into cheers and applause — a rare reaction in normally staid hearings.”

fuckyeahriotgrrrlsofcolor:

stfuconservatives:

This kickass lady (and Kansas state representative) really said that

"The Legislature’s annual attempt to repeal a statute allowing in-state tuition for Kansas students without legal residency drew an emotional crowd to a House committee Wednesday.

Students who have lived in the United States most of their lives got choked up as they described the academic lifeline in-state tuition has provided to improve their lives. A counselor who works with such students in Wichita high schools shed tears as she showed legislators a scrapbook of success stories. Murmurs of unrest were heard in the gallery as one House member asked about the prevalence of illegal immigrants from gangs and drug cartels in American prisons.

But nothing drew a bigger reaction than when Rep. Ponka We-Victors, D-Wichita, wrapped up a series of questions to the bill’s chief proponent, Secretary of State Kris Kobach.

“I think it’s funny Mr. Kobach, because when you mention illegal immigrant, I think of all of you,” said Victors, the Legislature’s lone American Indian member.

The heavily pro-immigrant gallery burst into cheers and applause — a rare reaction in normally staid hearings.”

Reblogged from girljanitor  10,049 notes

I confront [white guilt] every year, about a month into my course on racism, among [white] students who come to me in tears because they cannot deal with the racism that goes on in their families or their home towns or their student residences. Their tears are the result of genuine anguish, care, and a desire to learn and to change. I confront similar attitudes among my colleagues, and I am similarly gratified by their concern. But those who experience white guilt need to learn three things:

1) People of colour are generally not moved by their tears, and may even see those tears as a self-indulgent expression of white privilege. It is after all a great privilege to be able to express one’s emotion openly and to be confident that one is in a cultural context where one’s feelings will be understood.

2) Guilt is paralysing. It serves no purposes; it does no good. It is not a substitute for activism.

3) White guilt is often patronizing if it leads to pity for those of colour. Pity gets in the way of sincere and meaningful human relationships, and it forestalls the frankness that meaningful relationships demand. White guilt will not change the racialized environment; it will only make the guilty feel better. By "Women of Colour in Canadian Academia," Audrey Kobayashi (via lamaracuya)   (via hagereseb)